Download e-book for iPad: Arguing about Slavery: The Great Battle in the United States by William Lee Miller

By William Lee Miller

ISBN-10: 0394569229

ISBN-13: 9780394569222

A blow-by-blow new edition of the conflict royal that raged in Congress within the 1830s, whilst a small band of representatives, led through President John Quincy Adams of Massachusetts, hired complex stratagems to outwit the Southern (and Southern-sympathizing) sponsors of the successive "gag" ideas that had lengthy blocked debate with reference to slavery.

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Download e-book for kindle: Arguing about Slavery: The Great Battle in the United States by William Lee Miller

A blow-by-blow new edition of the conflict royal that raged in Congress within the 1830s, while a small band of representatives, led by means of President John Quincy Adams of Massachusetts, hired problematic stratagems to outwit the Southern (and Southern-sympathizing) sponsors of the successive "gag" principles that had lengthy blocked debate with reference to slavery.

Additional info for Arguing about Slavery: The Great Battle in the United States Congress

Example text

Its success under Jackson, and its prospects of continuing that success under his vice-president and proposed successor, Martin Van Buren, were founded on an alliance between Southern planters and Northern common folk that excessive concentration on the subject of slavery would threaten. The new Whig Party, too, had Northern and Southern branches, and Immediate Representatives in fact its components may have been more deeply divided on the topic of slavery than the Democrats. The history of the next two decades would certainly prove that concentrating on the subject would not be healthy for the Whig Party.

But it is one of the annoying features of representative government in a free republic that a parliamentary situation that allows some representa­ tives to hold forth against accessories before the fact of murder, robbery, rape, and infanticide, against those for whom the word "fanatic" is too mild, also gives other representatives, who might take a different view of these matters, their chance to speak, and to present a different view. Were there any such congressmen? There certainly were not many.

And what had the House done? It had sent them all to a select committee, which had composed so cogent an all-purpose response as to quiet the controversy forever. But perhaps the House suspected that this slavery matter was going to cut deeper than the issue of Sunday mail. There were old motions, new motions, motions to put on the table, rulings by the chair, appeals from rulings by the chair, points of order, calls for the previous question, and inquiries as to just what question was before the House.

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Arguing about Slavery: The Great Battle in the United States Congress by William Lee Miller


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